Three Sisters, Blue Mountains, NSW

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Three Sisters, Blue Mountains, NSW

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Huonville, Aerial view

Huonville

Tasmania

The township of Huonville is just a 30 minute drive south of the central Hobart, travelling along the A6 highway in the heart of the Huon Valley. You will be captivated by the beautiful scenery during the journey, descending from the surrounding hills into a valley of surprises, with views of the majestic South West as its backdrop. Situated on the banks of the stunning Huon River, Huonville offers a multitude of experiences, from breathtaking bushwalks to a riverside stroll, a picnic by the river to a fine dining experience and everything in between. Pick some fruit or taste the fruits of somebody else’s hard labour at a nearby cellar door; throw a line in the river or get out on it in a variety of ways – something to suit everybody’s taste in adventure. With a rich and complex maritime history and rural heritage, delicious food and beverages, health and wellness retreats, picturesque coastline dotted with beautiful beaches, landscaped gardens and friendly artists and crafts people – many selling their wares at various weekend markets around the region. It is an area where you can totally immerse yourself and create your own personal adventure... A variety of accommodation options are covered including self-contained cabins/cottages, quality B&B’s, farm stays, caravan parks, hotel-style rooms and backpacker’s hostels.

Tarraleah, Highland Cattle

Tarraleah

Tasmania

Tarraleah was once home to hundreds of hydro electric workers building one of Australia’s first hydro-electric schemes in Tasmania’s central highlands. Today, the whole town of 1920s and 1930s wooden homes has been restored as an elegant wilderness resort. Tarraleah means Forrester kangaroo in the language of the local Aboriginal people, and the site is host to an enormous range of Tasmanian flora and fauna. It is quite possible to see platypus and quolls, wallabies, wombats, Tasmanian devils and echidnas wandering around the town all on the same evening, and some say the Tasmanian tiger is also about. The town’s central Lodge, built in the 1930s for the Hydro engineers and company directors, has been restored to the elegance of its early days when money and craftsmanship were no object. The Art Deco building now houses a contemporary and luxuriously comfortable nine bedroom small luxury hotel – a showcase of Tasmanian art and craft. The town’s cottage, hand built by Tasmanian craftsmen in the 1930s, have also been restored as self-contained one to three bedroom holiday cottages. Tarraleah is 114 kilometres (70 miles), or two hours’ drive, northwest of Hobart on the A10 Highway between Hamilton and Lake St Clair. Geographically it is 20 kilometres from the physical centre of Tasmania, right on the edge of the World Heritage Area – Franklin Gordon Wild Rivers National Park and Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park. Look out for the huge water pipes which “tumble” down the side of a valley near the chalet. The weather in the central highlands is often wild and woolly, and because of the slightly higher elevation it is cooler in the summer and winter. So remember to bring a warm jacket and wet weather gear.

Geeveston - Southern Forests

Geeveston

Tasmania

Geeveston is the administrative centre for the timber industries and apple growers of south eastern Tasmania. It is 62 kilometres (39 miles) south west of Hobart on Highway A6, and is the gateway to the Arve River forests and Hartz Mountains National Park. In the town centre you will find the Geeveston Forest and Heritage Centre, which tells the story of the area and the surrounding forests. Further west along Arve Road Forest Drive (Highway C631) is the Tahune Forest Reserve and the Tahune Airwalk. The area’s rivers are home to brown trout and you can visit the Geeveston Highlands Salmon and Trout Fishery to learn the skill of flyfishing. In the lush green valleys nearby, apple orchards pattern the hillsides and during the soft autumn days you can buy buckets of Pink Lady, Crofton, Red Delicious, Granny Smith and Fuji apples from roadside stalls. Geeveston has bed and breakfast, lodge and backpacker accommodation and is a good base to stay while exploring the forests, national park and Picton and Huon rivers. The area was explored during the first days of the colony but not settled until the mid 1800s. Even before the English settled Tasmania, the French explorer Admiral Bruny D’Entrecasteaux (1792) marvelled at the height and girth of the trees covering the landscape. One of the first families to settle the area was the Geeves, who moved to Lightwood Bottom in 1850. The town’s name was changed to Geeves Town in 1861, and eventually became Geeveston. To reach Geeveston from Hobart, take the Highway A6 to Huonville and continue through Franklin, home of the Wooden Boat School, to Geeveston. Geeveston’s location in the southern forests dictate its weather pattern. It may be slightly cooler at any time of the year, so always make sure you have a warm jacket and wet weather gear, particularly if you plan to explore the wonderful mountains of the Hartz Mountains National Park.

Strathgordon - Lake Pedder

Strathgordon

Tasmania

Strathgordon is located deep in Tasmania’s south west and boasts Australia’s largest freshwater catchment. Lake Pedder and Lake Gordon lie at the northern edge of Tasmania’s south west wilderness, holding about 27 times more water than Sydney Harbour. Together, the lakes form Australia’s largest freshwater catchment. Both lakes are excellent wild trout fisheries and have good boat launching facilities. Always check the weather forecast before boating as lake conditions can change rapidly.

Derwent Valley and Central Highlands

Derwent Valley and Central Highlands

Tasmania

The Derwent Valley takes its name from the mighty river that rises at Lake St Clair and includes rich farmlands, rural settlements named by Scots and Irish settlers, and rugged escarpments and forests. It’s a valley of tough pioneers, explorers, bushmen, dam builders and bush rangers. Their stories begin in the historic town of New Norfolk, with its fine collection of heritage buildings. Look for Australia’s oldest Anglican church, the quaint toll house by the bridge, and the Oast House Museum, where the scent of hops still lingers on. Further on are the Salmon Ponds where the first brown trout were hatched in the late 1800s. Today, their descendants provide some of the world ’s finest fly fishing in Tasmania ’s many lakes, rivers and streams. Beyond historic farming settlements of Hamilton and Ouse, the highway climbs into the highlands, crossing rivers where power stations harness the boundless energy of falling water. It reaches the stark beauty of the Central Plateau where 10,000 years ago glaciers scraped the rocks bare, carving the cliffs and digging out the bed of Lake St Clair, Australia’s deepest lake. Turning off the westward highway, your route travels through to the lake country, where once a thick ice cap blanketed the land. Today, a myriad lakes, all teeming with trout, sparkle across the plateau. Largest of all, the Great Lake stretches from the fishing settlement of Miena to Breona in the north, where the partially unsealed road begins to descend through tall forests with cascading waterfalls. Descending south-eastwards from Miena, the landscape gradually softens, and the place names reflect a European heritage - Nant, Cluny, Dennistoun - and Bothwell, a stately town on the edge of the wild country. It was Nant that John Mitchel, the Irish journalist and member of the Young Irelander political group, was housed until he escaped with the help of the New York Irish..

Gladstone

Gladstone

Tasmania

Founded in the 1870s as part of the tin mining boom in northeast Tasmania. On the road to the northern entrance to Mt William National Park, Gladstone is today the service centre for the Far North East and a good base from which to explore the magnificent coastline and heath lands of Mount William National Park. Make Gladstone your base – a range of accommodation is available, from pub and hostel-style to powered sites and self-contained accommodation.

Greater Hobart

Greater Hobart

Tasmania

Greater Hobart, including the cities of Clarence and Glenorchy as well as the town of Richmond, is an intriguing blend of heritage and lifestyle, scenery and vibrant culture. It’s a city defined by the river and sea. Take a harbour cruise, or drive to the summit of Mount Nelson or Mount Wellington, and you will understand our maritime focus - suburbs hug the Derwent River, city buildings cluster around the docks and the estuary broadens into Storm Bay and the distant sea. Twenty-five kilometres and 100 years from the busy city is the historic town of Richmond - in the narrow cells of the old Richmond Gaol, Tasmania’s convict past seems just a clink of chains away. Close by are the neat vineyards and wineries of the Coal River Valley, home of superb cool-climate wines

Triabunna

Triabunna

Tasmania

Triabunna is a scenic port town on Tasmania’s east coast, 88 kilometres/55 miles north-east of Hobart. Triabunna is the major civic centre for the east coast, with a permanent population of over 700 people. Its main industries are fishing – try the succulent local scallops, mussels and abalone – and a major woodchip mill at Point Home. The town is surrounded by inviting beaches, undulating hills and tracts of eucalypt forest. Here, you can cast off into the sheltered waters of Spring Bay, a harbour tucked away at the southern end of Great Oyster Bay, for a day’s fishing or sailing. Drift through kelp forests and over coral reefs on a scuba diving trip to nearby Maria Island - also a haven for bushwalking, cycling and wildlife. Information on ferry services to the Island is available at Triabunna’s Visitor Information Centre (03 6257 4772). Make sure you see the Centre’s display of wall tapestries depicting the area’s rich Aboriginal and European history and visit the adjacent Tasmanian Seafarers Memorial. The town has a range of accommodation and there are shops, galleries and tearooms perfect for lazing away a morning. You can enjoy some wonderful walks in Triabunna’s coastal reserves including the Pelican Walk, which begins near the marina. Other walks at nearby Orford include the Wielangta Forest and Old Convict Road. Australia’s first rural municipality, Triabunna was established in the 1820s as a whaling station and garrison town servicing the Maria Island penal colony. Its colonial past is reflected in several historic buildings, including the sandstone St Mary’s Anglican Church (1880) and Spring Bay Hotel (1838). Triabunna is an Aboriginal word meaning native hen – a fast-running, flightless bird found only in Tasmania. Many of these birds – which can reach speeds of up to 50 kilometres/31 miles an hour - can be seen foraging near streams and pastureland in the area. Tasmania’s east coast experiences warmer temperatures and settled weather year round than other parts of t

Beaconsfield

Beaconsfield

Tasmania

The small town of Beaconsfield sits on the western banks of the Tamar River in the heart of the Tamar Valley Wine Region. With a population of around 1,000 people the town's economy is focused around the revitalised gold mine. Beaconsfield is 40 kilometres (24 miles) north west of Launceston and 240 kilometres (150 miles) north of Hobart. Like so many Australian regional towns it has been through a series of name changes. Originally, it was known as Cabbage Tree Hill, and when goldmining began in the 1870s it became known as Brandy Creek. Its present name was proclaimed in 1879 to honour the Prime Minister of Great Britain, Sir Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield. By 1881 Beaconsfield was regarded as the richest gold town in Tasmania. At its peak there were 53 companies working the goldmines. The last mine closed in 1914 when the mining technology of the day proved uneconomical. Mining started again in the early 1990s when the price of gold and advancement in technology made it more economically viable. On April 25, 2006, three miners, Larry Knight, Brant Webb and Todd Russell were trapped by a rockfall. Two days later Larry Knight was found dead but miraculously, three days later Webb and Russell were located alive one kilometre (3000 feet) below ground, trapped in a 1.5 metre square wire cage (five feet square). After a further nine days of painstaking work they walked to freedom on May 9, 2006.

Westerway

Westerway

Tasmania

Westerway is a village located in the beautiful Derwent Valley just an hour north west of Hobart and only 10 minutes from the magnificent Mt Field National Park. Located on the picturesque Tyenna River, it is an ideal location for photography, trout fishing, platypus-viewing or as a base for visiting the Styx and Florentine valleys, Lake Pedder and Southwest National Park. Summer visitors can sample the delights of the surrounding berry farms and cherry orchards, while winter gives the opportunity to visit the nearby snowfields at Mt Mawson. Originally known as Russell, the town was renamed Westerway in 1919 and became a centre for the local timber and hops industries with some of the original railway buildings and oast houses still to be seen. Accommodation is available at a number of B&Bs. Dining is available at the local cafe while provisions, fuel and post office facilities are available at the roadhouse. Take the time to explore Westerway and its surrounds and you won't be disappointed.

Information provided by the Australian Tourism Data Warehouse

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