Three Sisters, Blue Mountains, NSW

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Three Sisters, Blue Mountains, NSW

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Stanley - The Nut.

Stanley

Tasmania

Stanley is the second largest settlement west of Wynyard on the northern coast. It is part of the Circular Head Municipality. Smithton is the main business area of this Municipality. Stanley’s iconic ‘Nut’, a volcanic plug rising 150 metres (492 feet), likened to an enormous Christmas cake by explorers Bass and Flinders. Stanley has a population of 450. Its main industries are fishing and tourism. For an aerobic workout Stanley-style – or to walk off the town’s speciality (fish and chips) – you can climb a winding path to the windblown plateau of the Nut. Alternatively, take the chairlift to appreciate the uninterrupted views of Bass Strait. This is a great place for guided tours. The Tarkine Wilderness Area, to the south, has gained international recognition for its temperate rainforest, and you can travel there by four-wheel-drive with guides who know the area intimately. Closer to Stanley, brave Highfield Historic Site to learn how the area’s first European settlers lived. Historic tours are also offered through Stanley’s streets, lined with stone cottages dating back to the town’s settlement. Stanley is a good base to stay and explore the wilderness areas and take a wildlife tour. Seal-spotting cruises and penguin watching at the foot of the Nut are a must. There are bushwalks in nearby Rocky Cape National Park. Tours of Woolnorth are popular – the historic property, still operated under its original Van Diemen’s Land Company charter, also has modern influences, including a large, productive wind farm. Stanley was discovered by Bass and Flinders in 1798 and was named after the British Secretary of State for the Colonies, Lord Stanley. The first telephone transmission from Tasmania to mainland Australia was made in 1936 from Stanley. The town was also the birthplace of Joseph Lyons, currently the only Tasmanian to ever hold the office of prime minister. Stanley has an average maximum temperature of 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit) in January and 12.5 degrees Celsius

Wynyard - Table Cape Tulip Farm

Wynyard

Tasmania

Wynyard is a centre of agriculture on the A2 about 60 kilometres (37 miles) west of Devonport. The city is on the banks of the Inglis River sheltered by Table Cape - flat-topped and fertile and during spring it is carpeted in tulips. Take a boat out, go fishing, ride a horse, swing a golf club or a tennis racquet, or just go walking or driving. This is a beautiful stretch of coast, with beaches and bays in either direction. The Wonders of Wynyard is the local visitor centre with a world class collection of vintage Ford cars and local art. Behind the town you’ll pass village after tiny village as you explore the country roads among the farmlands, patchworked in green, gold and dark chocolaty brown. Wynyard has a direct link to Melbourne from Burnie Airport. You can fly to King and Three Hummock islands from Wynyard.

Cockle Creek

Cockle Creek

Tasmania

Cockle Creek, on Tasmania's southeast coast, is the most southerly town in Australia. The tiny seaside settlement of a few shacks 90 kilometres south of Geeveston is a quiet corner, ideal for a summer swim, picnic or campsite. It is also the beginning, or the end, of the South Coast Track, one of Tasmania’s great bushwalks.

Mole Creek, Marakoopa Cave

Mole Creek

Tasmania

Mole Creek occupies a valley between the Gog Range and the Great Western Tiers in the central north, not far from Tasmania’s highest point, Mount Ossa. This is an area of fascinating limestone caves that have been forming over the past 450 million years and are now protected in Tasmania’s only underground national park. There are more than 300 caves and sinkholes in all, many featuring streams and springs. Public tours are conducted through King Solomons and Marakoopa caves, and each give you a very different experience. King Solomons is noted for its lavish colours and formations, while Marakoopa is a wet cave containing the largest display of glow worms in Australia. For equally spectacular scenery, be adventurous and join a wild cave tours. You will journey through underground streams and squeeze between rocky passages with only a headlamp to illuminate your path – be prepared to get wet. After navigating the caves, you can join a four wheel drive tour of the Mersey valley, visit a leatherwood honey farm, or try white-water rafting on the upper Mersey. There are many pleasant short walks in the area at Liffey Falls and Arm River. You’ll be rewarded by beautiful scenery on longer bushwalks at Lake Rowallan and the Walls of Jerusalem National Park. There’s plenty of wildlife at Mole Creek – including the world’s largest barn owl and native Australian animals at the Trowunna Wildlife Park. Mole Creek is home to little more than 200 people, most of whom earn their living from farming and forestry. It was named after of a small stream that veered underground, like a mole. The area was originally inhabited by Aboriginal people and was explored by Europeans hunting for fur skins in the 1830s. The average maximum temperature for January is 21.5 degrees, while in June it’s 11 degrees. Mole Creek is 72 kilometres (45 miles) west of Launceston. Take the B54 as far as Deloraine and the B12 from there.

Mt Wellington - View from city

Mt Wellington

Tasmania

Rising 1270 metre (around 4000 feet) above Hobart's harbour and the wide Derwent River, Mt Wellington provides a wilderness experience within 20 minutes of the city and is much loved by locals. The 21 kilometre drive to the summit takes you from temperate rainforest to sub-alpine flora and glacial rock formations, ending in panoramic views of Hobart, Bruny Island, South Arm and the Tasman Peninsula. The interpretation centre at the top protects you from the blustering winds and a viewing platform on the western side of the car park looks out to the southern World Heritage Area beyond. Bushwalking trails suit all fitness levels and barbecue and picnic facilities are provided. Mountain activities also include cycling and abseiling. The Aboriginal name for Mt Wellington is Unghbanyahletta or Poorawetter. In February 1836 Charles Darwin climbed Mt Wellington during a visit on the HMAS Beagle.

Currie - Currie Harbour

Currie

Tasmania

Currie is on the west coast of King Island, north-east of mainland Tasmania. You are sure to feel its remoteness as you gaze at the Southern Ocean – next stop: Africa. Almost 800 people live in Currie, the commercial centre of the Island. Industries include fishing, farming, and harvesting bull kelp for food and cosmetics. King Island’s 200 kilometres (124 miles) of coastline contain rugged cliffs softened occasionally by white, sandy beaches. More than 60 ships have been wrecked off these unforgiving shores, and a trail now guides you to interpretive plaques all around the island describing the various calamities. Scuba diving on the wrecks themselves is by far the best way to see them. If you walk on a deserted beach you may be lucky enough to find a large, coiled nautilus shell. King Island has popular surfing beaches and sheltered lagoons for swimming. You can visit a 7,000-year-old calcified forest, created when the sand covering a forest finally receded, leaving fascinating limestone features. You can see all kinds of wildlife on the island too – wallabies, echidnas, seals, penguins and wild turkeys. You will receive royal treatment at King Island. Delectably tender beef, mouth-watering crayfish and gourmet dairy foods await you. Lush pastures and clean air contribute to the island’s worldwide recognition for superior quality produce. Currie Harbour was discovered by Captain Archibald Currie in 1797. In 1845 Australia’s worst peacetime maritime disaster occurred when 400 emigrants aboard the Cataraqui perished off the island’s coast. Cape Wickham lighthouse was erected in 1861 to prevent more ships from meeting such a fate. The town grew when scheelite mining began in 1917. Currie has an average maximum of 20.5 degrees Celsius (69 degrees Fahrenheit) in January and 13.5 degrees Celsius (56.5 degrees Fahrenheit) in June. Currie, on King Island, is 80 kilometres (49.5 miles) north-east of mainland Tasmania, and is accessible by plane and cargo vessels.

Coles Bay

Coles Bay

Tasmania

The east coast village of Coles Bay sits beneath pink granite mountains at the entrance to Freycinet National Park. With a small permanent population of less than 200 people, the town caters to local and visitor needs. The Coles Bay area is one of our Island’s most popular holiday spots for visitors and locals. It overlooks crystal clear Oyster Bay – ideal for swimming, snorkelling, kayaking, boating and fishing. Prior to European settlement the Great Oyster Bay and Big River aboriginal tribes made the annual trek, in the cooler climate, for seafood and swan eggs. European settlers arrived in the early 1800s, and the area was developed by sealers, whalers, miners and farmers. After Freycinet National Park was declared in 1916 the area became increasingly popular as a holiday destination. Coles Bay is about 45 minutes’ drive from Swansea and around 30 minutes from Bicheno..

Sheffield - Mt Roland

Sheffield

Tasmania

Concealed in the foothills of majestic Mount Roland is the enterprising town of Sheffield, where history and art merge to create an entire town of murals. Almost 1,000 people live in Sheffield, farming sheep, cattle, deer and emus. You can learn about the history of the Kentish district from the murals themselves, or in local museums, but there are also many galleries and studies to browse in. At the Working Art Space you can talk with local artists as they work. The views from the summit of 1,234 metre Mount Roland are worth the climb. Sheffield is close to an alpaca farm, vineyards, Devil’s Gate Dam and Kimberley’s thermal springs. The beautiful Lake Barrington, created by the Mersey-Forth Hydro Electric Scheme, is an international rowing course and a haven for water sports. When you get to The Promised Land, you’ll find Tasmazia and the Village of Lower Crackpot, which has its own postcode. With seven mazes, Tasmazia is the largest complex of its kind in the world. It specialises in lavender, honey and pancakes. Sheffield was explored by Nathaniel Kentish in 1842 but its dense forests meant that it was not settled until1859. It was named by Edward Curr, after his homeland in Yorkshire. The town prospered in 1963 with the Power Development Scheme, but declined when the dams were completed. Sheffield is the centre of the Kentish district, and Mount Roland (named by Captain James Rolland in 1823) is a great source of artistic inspiration. Sheffield, 30 kilometres south of Devonport, reaches an average maximum temperature of 21 degrees in January and 11.5 degrees in June. Occasionally Mount Roland receives a dusting of snow – a visual delight.

Kettering

Kettering

Tasmania

Kettering is a small town in a peaceful, idyllic setting on the D'Entrecasteaux Channel, about 30 minutes’ drive or 37 kilometres south of Hobart. The area was first explored by French navigator Bruni D'Entrecasteaux in 1792 and by the early 1800s whalers, sealers and timber cutters had settled in the region. The area around Kettering continued to develop due to its suitability for timber, and berry and fruit farming. The scallop industry was also a boom in the first half of the 1800s. Kettering now has a thriving community involved in many artistic and maritime pursuits. Yachts, fishing boats, salmon farmers in their runabouts, and sea kayaks are all regular sights in the sheltered waterways. There are two major marinas, as well as many smaller, privately owned jetties, and over 600 boats that call Kettering home. It also serves as an important service hub for local farmers and producers. Vineyards and colourful orchards of berries, cherries and apples surround the general area. The Bruny Island Ferry, Mirambeena, is a vehicular ferry which runs a return trip numerous times a day from Kettering to Bruny Island. At the ferry terminal there is a comprehensive visitor centre also housing a gift shop and a waterfront cafe, which specialises in local produce and seafood. Kettering is also home to a distinctive 1930s built hotel, which boasts superb views across to Bruny Island. The hotel houses a restaurant and offers bar meals. A Turkish cafe also serves as the local deli, and don’t miss the speciality hand-made chocolates available from the local chocolatier. Great pizzas and coffee can be found at a small cafe opposite the oval. There are a number of accommodation options in the area, including charming self-contained cottages, beautifully appointed bed and breakfast options and luxurious suites overlooking the marina. The hotel also offers rooms upstairs. For a great view out across the D'Entrecasteaux Channel toward Bruny Island, take the short 10 minute walk through she-

Taranna - Tasmanian Devil Conservation Park

Taranna

Tasmania

Taranna is a small sleepy settlement just north of Port Arthur Historic Site on the Tasman Peninsula. The drive takes you south-east of Hobart for about 90 minutes (89 kilometres/55 miles) on the A9 Highway. At Taranna you will find the Tasmanian Devil Park, a cluster of accommodation of various types, and the Federation Chocolate outlet. During the height of the Port Arthur prison, Taranna was the terminus for a human railway which ran between the jetty at Little Norfolk Bay and the prison. It was designed to carry passengers and supplies unloaded at Norfolk Bay and saved the ships the hazardous journey around Cape Raoul. The railway was the first railway in Australia and probably the only one using human horsepower along the seven kilometre line. The weather on the Tasman Peninsula is affected by the winds coming off Frederick Henry Bay, so remember, no matter what time of year you visit; bring a warm jacket and all weather gear.

Information provided by the Australian Tourism Data Warehouse

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