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Taranna - Tasmanian Devil Conservation Park

Taranna

Tasmania

Taranna is a small sleepy settlement just north of Port Arthur Historic Site on the Tasman Peninsula. The drive takes you south-east of Hobart for about 90 minutes (89 kilometres/55 miles) on the A9 Highway. At Taranna you will find the Tasmanian Devil Park, a cluster of accommodation of various types, and the Federation Chocolate outlet. During the height of the Port Arthur prison, Taranna was the terminus for a human railway which ran between the jetty at Little Norfolk Bay and the prison. It was designed to carry passengers and supplies unloaded at Norfolk Bay and saved the ships the hazardous journey around Cape Raoul. The railway was the first railway in Australia and probably the only one using human horsepower along the seven kilometre line. The weather on the Tasman Peninsula is affected by the winds coming off Frederick Henry Bay, so remember, no matter what time of year you visit; bring a warm jacket and all weather gear.

Zeehan

Zeehan

Tasmania

Zeehan, once Tasmania’s third largest town, is north of Queenstown on the west coast. Rich in mining history, its economy is focused around tourism and the nearby Renison Bell tin mine. Its population of 900 is 10 times smaller than it was at its peak in the early 20th century. Put yourself in the shoes of early settlers by taking the historic walk around the town. In times gone by, it was a social hub for the entire west coast. The restored Gaiety Theatre, where celebrities such as Dame Nellie Melba once performed, has a capacity of 1,000 and was state of the art when it was built in 1899. The town’s mining heritage is just as rich and fascinating, as you will discover at the West Coast Pioneer Memorial Museum. From Zeehan you can fish for trout in Lake Pieman or crayfish at Granville Harbour. Visit Zeehan’s original port, Trial Harbour, or take in the views from the top of Mount Zeehan. Zeehan was first sighted by Abel Tasman, in 1642, when he saw the mountain peak later named Mount Zeehan by Bass and Flinders, after Tasman’s brig. In 1871 the discovery of tin at Mount Bischoff led to further exploration of the area. Little more than 10 years later, Frank Long discovered silver and lead, sparking the largest mining boom on Tasmania’s west coast. Ultimately, however, the reserves were depleted – the town once known as Silver City ceased mining the precious metal in 1914. Zeehan’s average maximum temperature in summer is 19.5 degrees Celsius (67 degrees Fahrenheit) and 11 degrees Celsius (52 degrees Fahrenheit) in winter. As in many west coast centres, wet weather gear is likely to come in handy here – Zeehan averages 2.5 metres (eight feet) of rain a year. Zeehan is 150 kilometres (93 miles) south-west of Burnie, and 50 kilometres (30 miles) from Strahan.

Campbell Town - The Red Bridge

Campbell Town

Tasmania

Campbell Town was one of the early coaching stops between Launceston and Hobart and sits on the banks of the Elizabeth River. It was named by Governor Lachlan Macquarie, after his wife’s family, during a visit in 1821. It was, and is, the centre of the sheep-farming region and is a popular stopping point on the journey north and south. It has a population is around 900, and there is an impressive collection of colonial buildings such as The Grange (the local wealthy doctor’s house designed by convict architect James Blackburn in the late 1840s), the Foxhunters Return a lovely example of a 19th century inn built in 1834, St Luke’s Church (1939) and the convict-built Red Bridge (1836). From Campbell Town you can head east past Lake Leake to Freycinet and the east coast. Just opposite St Luke’s look out for the monument to Harold Gatty, a native son of Campbell Town. In 1931, with American Wiley Post, he was the first person to fly around the world. In 1929, Gatty had flown as navigator with Roscoe Turner in a record 19-hour non-stop flight from Los Angeles to New York. He went on to serve, as an Australian citizen, in the U.S. Army Air Corps.

East Coast Escape - Wineglass Bay

East Coast Escape

Tasmania

A route that lets you explore fishing villages, penguin rookeries, vineyards, off-coast islands, National Parks, mountains and gorges. The renowned Freycinet Peninsula has Wineglass Bay, recognised as one of the world’s top beaches. Beyond Bicheno, the pristine beaches continue with names like Chain of Lagoons and Bay of Fires. Oysters, mussels, abalone and scallops are farmed in the clean waters, lobsters are retrieved from pots, and licensed divers seek out their fortune harvesting wild abalone along the unspoiled coast. The trip to Orford offers the chance to travel beside an original convict road - the stony remains of one of Australia’s first highways. Off-shore, the convict heritage continues on Maria Island, with evocative ruins and a restored penal settlement.

Port Sorell

Port Sorell

Tasmania

The seaside town of Port Sorell, on the Rubicon River estuary, is a quiet getaway, close to some of the best natural wildlife viewing opportunities in the state. Port Sorell has a population of 1,950, which increases significantly in the summer months when holidaymakers flock to camping grounds and shacks. Its boat ramp is the busiest on the north-west coast. Water sports include water skiing and sea kayaking, but if you prefer to keep dry, you can relax on the sandy dunes, fish from the floating pontoon, play a round of golf and one of the two local courses, or walk along the picturesque foreshore. Nearby are Shearwater, Hawley Beach and Freers Beach. At low tide it is possible to walk to Penguin Island and Rabbit Island – the latter a hideout for bushrangers in the mid-1800s. Just across the Rubicon are Narawntapu National Park, abounding in Forester kangaroos, wallabies, wombats, and even Tasmanian devils. At dusk, you can catch sight of little penguins scampering up the beach at Point Sorell. Port Sorell was established in 1822 by Lieutenant-Governor William Sorell and was once the largest town on Tasmania’s north coast. The port traded in wattle bark, and thrived until it was outgrown by Devonport. Port Sorell even had a convict gaol on Watch House Hill, which was later replaced by a bowling green. Little evidence of Port Sorell’s history remains, after the town was destroyed by bushfire. Climate is temperate at Port Sorell, reaching an average maximum of 21 degrees Celsius (70 degrees Fahrenheit) in January and 13 degrees Celsius (55.5 degrees Fahrenheit) in June. Port Sorell is 117 kilometres (72.5 miles) north of Launceston and a 20 minute drive east of Devonport.

North - North East - Albert Hall, Launceston

North - North East

Tasmania

Tasmania's north-northeast is known for its fertile land and quality timber. Crops such as poppies and hops grow here, and grazing land for sheep is plentiful. A former mining area, relics of that era can still be found in north-eastern towns. Launceston is the largest city in the region. From Launceston, the island’s second major city, this area covers dark green forests, ancient mountain peaks, fields of summer lavender, vineyards, tiny villages, national parks and walking tracks along unspoiled beaches as far as you can see.

Port Arthur

Port Arthur

Tasmania

The village of Port Arthur is often missed because of the significance of the Historic Site, but there is so much to experience in the area that you may want to consider staying overnight, particularly as entry passes to the Site are valid for two days. Surfing, sea kayaking and bushwalking are popular and the coastline is spectacular. A short drive south of Port Arthur is Remarkable Cave, so called because its opening is said to resemble a map of Tasmania. From here you can walk to Crescent Bay, a secluded curve of striking beauty backed by huge sand dunes. Just 20 kilometres (12.5 miles) north-west is the Coal Mines Historic Site, where interpretive signs explain the harsh lives and working conditions of repeat offenders from Port Arthur who worked underground extracting coal. Look out for DooTown, a quirky shack community devoted to homes with a theme: “GunnaDo”, “She’ll Doo”, "Humpty Doo” – and many more. The settlement began life in 1830 as a timber station. In the years that followed, convicts created a small town for 1,100 inmates at its peak in the early 1840s Port Arthur’s maximum average daily temperature is 18.5 degrees Celsius (65.5 degrees Fahrenheit) in January and 11.5 degrees (52 degrees Fahrenheit) in June. It is 93 kilometres (58 miles) south-east of Hobart on the A9.

Port Arthur and Tasman  - Tasman Lighthouse

Port Arthur and Tasman

Tasmania

A concentrated package of the best Tasmania has to offer; a kaleidoscopic of habitats, wilderness, spectacular scenery, intriguing and extraordinary historic sites, fantastic walks, empty beaches, unique and enchanting wildlife, fishing, amazing surf, cruising, scuba diving and delicious local cuisine. Allow time to explore, to be wowed around every corner…simply soak up the atmosphere or indulge in recreational play. Home of the World Heritage Port Arthur Historic Site, the Tasman region hosts an abundance of offerings for your holiday or short break. Allow a few days to enjoy a taste of Tasmania that you will cherish – you will undoubtedly want to come back again and again.

Bicheno

Bicheno

Tasmania

Bicheno, just north of the Freycinet Peninsula on Tasmania’s stunning east coast, is known for its laid-back lifestyle and outdoor activities. If a holiday relaxing by white, sandy beaches, dining on fresh seafood and playing leisurely games of golf sounds appealing, you’ll love Bicheno. More than 700 people live in the town, and water’s its lifeblood. Crayfish, abalone and Australian salmon are often brought ashore with the daily fishing catch. You can explore the coast at your own pace in a sea kayak, or pick up some local knowledge on a guided boat trip. Marine life and sea birds abound in Governors Island Marine Reserve – stay dry in a glass-bottomed boat or scuba dive amid sheer rock walls, deep fissures, caves, sponges and sea whips. Tasmania is considered one of the best temperate water dive sites in the world. There is plenty to do on dry land as well. Motor tricycle tours, a Grape Escape wine tour, and walks to Rocking Rock and the blowhole or along the sandbar to Diamond Island Nature Reserve are popular. Penguin tours are one of the town’s most popular attractions, while the local wildlife park has a wide array of fauna, including kangaroos, Tasmanian devils and pelicans. Waterfalls tumble to tranquil lakes and river ravines in nearby Douglas–Apsley National Park, while to the south, in Freycinet National Park, you can take the famous walk to Wineglass Bay, one of the best beaches in the world. Formerly known as Waubs Boat Harbour, Bicheno was established as a whaling centre in 1803. The town was named after James Ebenezer Bicheno and expanded in 1854 with the discovery of coal in the Denison River. Bicheno has mild weather, with an average maximum of 21 degrees Celsius (70 degrees Fahrenheit) in January and 14.5 degrees Celsius (48 degrees Fahrenheit) in June. The town is 182 kilometres (113 miles) north east of Hobart via the Tasman Highway.

George Town

George Town

Tasmania

George Town sits on the eastern banks of the Tamar River about 40 minutes’s drive (50 kilometres/32 miles) north of Launceston. It is the third oldest settlement in Australia after Sydney and Hobart. At nearby Low Head you can explore one of the best-preserved examples of an early pilot station, built by convicts in 1805. The pilot station is still in operation today. Also, from Low Head you can take a penguin tour to see the world’s smallest penguins clamber to their nests each night. To the east are the vineyards of Pipers River, and the Bridestowe Lavender Farm. Just south of George Town along the shores of the Tamar River is the deep-water port of Bell Bay and as you follow the A8 Highway you can stop by the Lavender Garden at Rowella, and the Hillwood Strawberry Farm. George Town area with a population around 5,600 offers a range of accommodation from hotels and motels to bed and breakfast. George Bass and Matthew Flinders explored the area in 1798 during their circumnavigation of Tasmania, and in 1804 Captain William Paterson set up a small encampment. In 1806, the settlement was abandon for the current Launceston location. Northern Tasmania was governed from Sydney until 1812 when it came under the jurisdiction of Hobart Town. George Town’s weather is similar to Launceston, which is slightly cooler in winter and warmer in summer than Hobart and the east coast. No matter what time of year you visit, bring a warm jacket and all weather gear.

Zur Verfügung gestellt vom Australian Tourism Data Warehouse