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Central Australian Desert - Northern Territory

Northern Territory

Northern Territory

The Northern Territory occupies about one sixth of Australia’s total land mass, with a population of about 200,000 and is home to some of the natural world’s most unique and exciting destinations. Equivalent in size to France, Italy and Spain combined, it is blessed with an abundance of natural environments. The Northern Territory story unfolds through six main destinations. From the red sandy desert of Alice Springs and Uluru / Ayers Rock and the golden plains of Tennant Creek, to the savannah woodlands surrounding Katherine and the lush green tropics of Darwin and Kakadu, it's not surprising the Northern Territory is a popular destination for travellers keen to experience Australia’s outback. It is known around the world for its iconic natural treasures, including the World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park and Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. The flora and fauna is as diverse as desert blooms are to lotus lilies and the fearsome saltwater crocodile is to the Brolga, the elegant dancing bird that is Northern Territory emblem. The Northern Territory has a rich Indigenous culture and the Aboriginal people hold a spiritual connection to the land that dates back tens of thousands of years. Their culture can be shared today - through a walk in the desert in search of bush tucker, a visit to the ancient rock art galleries, or simply sitting in on a story-telling session. One of the most popular ways to explore the Northern Territory is by vehicle and the Northern Territory's well-maintained roads cover some of the most memorable scenery in Australia. Themed drives include the Nature’s Way, Red Centre Way, Explorer’s Way, Binn's Track and part of the Savannah Way which traverse a number of regions throughout the Territory. There are a number of challenging four-wheel drive detours to beautiful and secluded destinations that allow you to experience the most rugged parts of the Territory.

Darwin and surrounds Northern Territory

Darwin and Surrounds

Northern Territory

The tropical Top End is dramatic, vibrant and friendly, and offers a range of experiences. Darwin, the Northern Territory’s cosmopolitan capital, is a great place to begin exploring. The city offers a range of accommodation and facilities, and is a popular holiday destination, thanks to its relaxed charm and proximity to the region’s iconic natural wonders. An hour south of Darwin is Berry Springs Nature Park, a swimming and recreational area and the popular Territory Wildlife Park is just next door. Operating on the nearby Adelaide River, regular jumping crocodile cruises provide the chance to see saltwater crocodiles propel themselves from the water. Further south along the Stuart Highway is Litchfield National Park, a great place to cool off beneath cascading waterfalls and view attractions such as unique magnetic termite mounds, monsoonal rainforests and tumbling rocky waterholes. World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park is 250 kilometres from Darwin on the Arnhem Highway. To the north of Darwin are the Tiwi Islands where visitors can share in the culture of the Tiwi people. Take an organised tour and purchase some local art and crafts, chat with some of the local Tiwi ladies over a pot of billy tea, or fish the clear waters surrounding the islands. Fishing is a popular Northern Territory pastime, with Darwin and Bynoe Harbours offering excellent fishing. The Daly River, the Mary River wetlands and the Victoria River are among the fishing hot spots while Dundee Beach and Mandorah Beach boast stretches of sandy coastline.

Gulf Area Northern Territory

Gulf Area

Northern Territory

The remote Gulf area stretches east of Katherine to the Queensland border and meets the Gulf of Carpentaria, a shallow sea between Australia and Papua New Guinea. The area, home to four main indigenous language groups, includes many large Australian cattle stations. The Gulf is one of Australia’s most exciting fishing destinations. On the Northern Territory side of the Gulf, Roper Bar is the natural rock crossing separating the saltwater and freshwater sections of the Roper River. The township of Borroloola, located 600 kilometres south of Roper Bar on the McArthur River (both of which are renowned fishing hot spots), is the Gulf area’s main service centre. A range of services and a taste of Northern Territory hospitality can be found in this friendly town. King Ash Bay is a popular fishing spot 50 kilometres from Borroloola. Cape Crawford, 100 kilometres south west of Borroloola, is another major base from which to explore the Gulf area. Surrounded by golden grasslands, rock escarpments, waterfalls and waterholes, Cape Crawford is within easy reach of Limmen National Park (Proposed). The area is home to a magnificent array of native wildlife. Another must-see destination is Barranyi (North Island) National Park, located in the Sir Edward Pellew Group of Islands. A haven for wildlife, the park provides a home to nesting turtles and migratory birds. Access to the islands is limited, and you must contact Parks and Wildlife NT before making the journey. The Savannah Way, an adventure tourism drive along the Carpentaria Highway, is a great option for exploring this unique region.

Darwin Northern Territory

Darwin

Northern Territory

Darwin, the Northern Territory’s vibrant capital, is a city with influences that are as much Asian as they are western. A city with dozens of nationalities sharing an easy-going lifestyle, Darwin is located on a peninsular with the sea on three sides. It is a place unvisited by winter where the weather can usually be described as either balmy or sultry. Darwin is well appointed, possessing most of the amenities expected of a much larger city. Watching sunsets and storms are something of a local pastime, and after a cleansing rain shower you can almost hear things growing. Try a delicious jackfruit curry, sip a fresh mango smoothie or sample some crocodile jerky at one of Darwin’s weekend markets. Regular markets are located throughout the city, but the Mindil Beach Sunset Markets are perhaps the best known. Operating every Thursday and Sunday evening between May and October, there are music and dance performances, art and craft stalls, and an eclectic mix of international dishes. Local restaurants also offer delicious cuisine – sit back and enjoy local favourites, like succulent mud crabs or barramundi. A great way to experience Darwin Harbour is to board a sunset cruise and drift by the scenic foreshore. There are many attractions within easy reach. Browse the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory. Hand-feed huge milkfish and even barramundi at Aquascene in Doctors Gully, see hundreds of crocodiles at Crocodylus Park, or stroll along the historic city walk to see many of Darwin’s historically significant sites. Darwin is a great base from which to explore the surrounding region and the World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park, which is located 250 kilometres from Darwin.

Darwin Area - Northern Territory

Darwin Area

Northern Territory

Darwin, the Northern Territory’s vibrant capital, is a city with influences that are as much Asian as they are western. A city with dozens of nationalities sharing an easy-going lifestyle, Darwin is located on a peninsular with the sea on three sides. It is a place unvisited by winter where the weather can usually be described as either balmy or sultry. Darwin is well appointed, possessing most of the amenities expected of a much larger city. Watching sunsets and storms are something of a local pastime, and after a cleansing rain shower you can almost hear things growing. An hour south of Darwin is Berry Springs Nature Park, a swimming and recreational area and the popular Territory Wildlife Park is just next door. Operating on the nearby Adelaide River, regular jumping crocodile cruises provide the chance to see saltwater crocodiles propel themselves from the water. Further south along the Stuart Highway is Litchfield National Park, a great place to cool off beneath cascading waterfalls and view attractions such as unique magnetic termite mounds, monsoonal rainforests and tumbling rocky waterholes. To the north of Darwin are the Tiwi Islands where visitors can share in the culture of the Tiwi people. Take an organised tour and purchase some local art and crafts, chat with some of the local Tiwi ladies over a pot of billy tea, or fish the clear waters surrounding the islands.

Berry Springs - Darwin Area - Northern Territory

Berry Springs

Northern Territory

Visitors to Berry Springs will find a general store, petrol station and camping and caravan facilities. The small settlement is mostly visited by people wanting to explore the Territory Wildlife Park and Berry Springs Nature Reserve. Located an hours drive south of Darwin, the reserve protects a large part of the Berry Creek catchment. Berry Creek begins as a series of springs, forming a small creek which flows into Darwin Harbour through a mangrove lined estuary. Visitors to Berry Springs can enjoy a refreshing swim in the springs and lunch in the nearby picnic ground. If you swim with goggles you can see many native fish and other aquatic life that live in the clear pools. Nearby, the world acclaimed Territory Wildlife Park, located on 800 hectares of natural bushland, showcases the wildlife of northern Australia which visitors can experience up close and in their natural habitat.

Katherine Northern Territory

Katherine

Northern Territory

Katherine is the third-largest town in the Northern Territory, with a population of around 8,000 and is located 300 kilometres south of Darwin. The town was named by the explorer John McDouall Stuart, after Catherine, the daughter of his benefactor. The region is home to the Jawoyn Aboriginal people. Katherine is often described as a place where ‘the outback meets the tropics’ and is well equipped with a range of accommodation and facilities. Travellers visiting Katherine may like to browse the Katherine Railway Museum, view the fine collection of Aboriginal art at Katherine Art Gallery, relax in the Katherine Hot Springs or gain an insight into the workings of a cattle station with a visit to the historic Springvale Homestead, built in 1878.

Barunga - Katherine Area - Northern Territory

Barunga

Northern Territory

Located 90 kilometres south-east of Katherine, Barunga is well known for its annual indigenous cultural and sporting festival which is usually held over the Queen's Birthday long weekend in June. Aboriginal people from all parts of the Northern Territory gather in Barunga for four days of cultural activities, dancing, arts and crafts and sporting events. Travellers can camp in the community during the festival and participate in the celebration of Aboriginal life, interacting with residents who will share their stories and culture.

Mary River Area Northern Territory

Mary River Area

Northern Territory

The Mary River area encompasses the Mary River National Park and Djukbinj National Park on the Arnhem Highway between Darwin and Kakadu National Park. Explorer John McDouall Stuart explored this area in the early 1860s and signed his name on a tree at the mouth of Mary River. Today, a memorial marks the site of the tree. Both the AdelaideRiver and Mary River are best known for their large populations of saltwater crocodiles, the undisputed stars of popular boat cruises that operate in the area. The area is also a popular fishing destination and offers some of the best barramundi fishing in the Northern Territory. The Mary River wetlands are part of a network of northern coastal wetlands that link eight major rivers in the Top End. This network is rare, fragile and ecologically important and some areas have been listed as of international importance. The Limilngan Wulna ‘freshwater’ Aboriginal people have made the Mary River region their home for thousands of years and continue to live, hunt and practise their traditional culture here today. The rich wetland environment is home to a variety of flora and fauna, including a multitude of migratory birds. Examples of species that can be observed include magpie geese, brolgas, white-bellied sea eagles, rufous owls and more. Accommodation options in the area range from airconditioned cabins to caravan parks and campsites.

Watarrka (Kings Canyon) Area Northern Territory

Watarrka (Kings Canyon) Area

Northern Territory

Watarrka National Park and its most famous landmark, Kings Canyon, is located 330 kilometres south west of Alice Springs in the Uluru / Kata Tjuta region of the Northern Territory. The park encompasses the western end of the George Gill Range and is home to a variety of unique native flora and fauna, including over 600 different plant species. Commercial accommodation can be found within the park at the Kings Canyon Resort and Kings Creek Station. The area has also been home to Luritja Aboriginal people for the last 20,000 years. The word Watarrka refers to the umbrella bush that proliferates in this area. Watarrka can be reached via the gravel Mereenie Loop Road (Red Centre Way) or via the sealed Luritja Road running off the Lasseter Highway.

Zur Verfügung gestellt vom Australian Tourism Data Warehouse