Secret food and wine gems in Tasmania

Tasmania is full of food and wine secrets just waiting to be discovered. In fact, there are so many hidden gems here that exploring the island is like one big treasure hunt with the most delicious rewards. From intimate organic bakeries favoured by locals, to food crawls by bus that take you on a gastronical adventure, there is plenty to explore! Tasmanian food and wine secrets can even be found in the cities, down a carriageway or around a corner. Finding them is half the fun; in true Tasmanian style, you’ve just got to have a stickybeak. Secret food and wine gems in Tasmania
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Secret food and wine gems in Tasmania

Tasmania is full of food and wine secrets – in fact, the island is like one big treasure hunt, with the most delicious rewards


Tasmania is full of food and wine secrets just waiting to be discovered. In fact, there are so many hidden gems here that exploring the island is like one big treasure hunt with the most delicious rewards. From intimate organic bakeries favoured by locals, to food crawls by bus that take you on a gastronical adventure, there is plenty to explore! Tasmanian food and wine secrets can even be found in the cities, down a carriageway or around a corner. Finding them is half the fun; in true Tasmanian style, you’ve just got to have a stickybeak.

Tasmanian Whisky Tours,
Redlands Estate Cellar Door,
Plenty, TAS

Tasmanian locals let you in on a little food secret

One easy way to get 'in the know' is to ask a local for an inside tip, whether it's a friendly stranger on the street or an informed tour guide with culinary credentials.

This is because the beauty of Tasmania’s best kept food secrets is often in the small details – like the little organic bakery out the back of Huonville (Summer Kitchen Cafe in Ranelagh), the tiny backyard brewery in Railton (Seven Sheds) or the boutique bottle shop with the big Tassie wine list (Cool Wines in Hobart).

In Hobart, Gourmania Food Tours takes hungry visitors on a food crawl of some of the city's best eateries and food stores, and there are bus tours of wine regions across the state. Tasmanian Whisky Tours explores the state’s renaissance whisky industry. Websites including the Tasmanian Whiskey TrailTasmanian Cider Trail and Cradle to Coast Tasting Trail allow you to make your own discoveries at your own pace.

Producers’ lunches are also popular across the state, and provide a behind-the-scenes look at the work of new and established makers. The Old Cable Station at Stanley hosts a seasonal producers’ lunch, and both Bruny Island and King Island host annual long lunches, sourcing produce local to their island only.

Tasmania’s providores and small grocers are another way to discover the state’s food secrets. Most are dedicated to local produce, and Tasmanian small batch production being what it is means the maker probably also delivered it to the providore themselves. So ask a local – you never know what you might discover.