Trouver destinations

Search results 21-30 of 615

Enjoy the pristine sands and clear waters of Dingo Beach

Dingo Beach

Queensland

Dingo Beach is a small township on the northern side of the Whitsunday Coast. Dingo Beach and its sister town of Hydeaway Bay are situated on Edgecumbe Bay on Cape Gloucester and boast miles of sandy beaches, crystal clear waters, bountiful fishing and plenty of opportunities to relax in the sun or kick back with a cold beverage or meal from one of the small group of beachfront pubs and eco resorts. Dingo Beach boasts a public boat ramp on its beachfront, enabling visitors to explore the northern waters of the Whitsunday Islands which are renowned for big game fishing and excellent snorkelling. The long, sandy beach has a stinger net for swimming safety in summer and public barbecues and picnic tables dotted along the beachfront under the shady trees. You can only get there by car, so if you didn't bring your own, hire one from the many outlets in Airlie Beach and explore one of the hidden wonders of the Whitsundays at your own pace, for a day or a few nights.

Aborginal art at Kajabbi

Kajabbi

Queensland

Kajabbi is a tiny, sleepy settlement in north west Queensland. It is located 118 kilometres north east of Mount Isa and 100 kilometres north west of Cloncurry. Whilst only a small settlement, Kajabbi stands in an area that is steeped in history. The warrior Kalkadoon tribe, after whom the local hotel is named, had their last battle against mounted troops on the slopes of nearby Battle Mountain. Whilst the Kalkadoon Hotel at Kajabbi has been closed for the last few years, there are a couple of fishing spots in the area. Mining relics, including smelter stacks, are still to be found at the sites of the former Dobbyn and Mount Cuthbert copper mines. There was a time when Kajabbi was an important centre. The nearby mines at Dobbyn and Mount Cuthbert attracted copper miners to the area and, as a railhead in the 1920s, it was a location where the cattle owners from the state's far north west brought their herds for shipment to the coast. There is wildlife aplenty in this part of the Outback - kangaroos, dingoes, freshwater crocodiles and many bird species.

Emmet

Emmet

Queensland

Emmet, in Queensland's Outback, was once a thriving railway siding with a population of 30 people. Today, with only two residents, the town has a picnic shelter and an interesting historical display in the revamped railway station. Emmet is the western gateway to the spectacular Idalia National Park where dry mulga scrub and rocky escarpments are home to the yellow footed rock wallaby.

Cows at Maclagan

Maclagan

Queensland

Maclagan at the foothills of the Bunya Mountains, and close neighbour Quinalow, perched on Myall Creek are friendly towns. Be sure to explore the network of beautiful bushwalking tracks nearby in the Bunya Mountains National Park. If you're not too easily spooked, venture through the old Muntapa Rail Tunnel and duck to avoid the colony of bats that call it home. You may even be lucky enough to see an echidna along the walk to the tunnel. The town boasts popular wineries Rimfire and Rangemore Estate.

Mulanah Gardens B&B Cottages

Inverlaw

Queensland

Approximately a 20 minute drive from Kingaroy, you will find Inverlaw. A picturesque landscape of rural farming land, you will find Mulanah Gardens B&B Cottages and Wedding Venue, a quiet and beautiful place to take some time out and relax. In nearby Kingaroy you will find a range of activities and attractions including a number of wineries and also the famous Peanut Van. The Bunya Mountains are approximately 40 minutes drive from Inverlaw and you can spend a day surrounded by lush rainforest and wildlife.

Bushwalking

Mount Glorious

Queensland

Glorious by name, glorious by nature. Tenderly embraced by lush rainforest, the endearing mountain hamlet of Mount Glorious is just 45 minutes drive from Brisbane on the magnificent D'Aguilar Range. Accessed by a winding mountain road, the tiny village is surrounded by mountainous National Park and protected forests. The drive up the mountain is peppered with breath-taking lookouts, picnic spots and points of natural interest. Be sure to stop a while and enjoy the view. At 680 metres above sea level the village is sometimes shrouded in cloudy mist. The cool mountain air makes Mount Glorious a particularly glorious place to visit during the hot summer months. In and around Mount Glorious you'll find a range of attractive accommodation options from weekend retreats and rainforest chalets, to bed-and-breakfasts and cosy cottages complete with fireplaces. Mount Glorious also plays host to a magnificent world-class sculpture garden set amongst thick lush rainforest. Feel your work-day worries melt away as you marvel at these beautiful works of art crafted from marble, stone, bronze and onyx. The stunning natural beauty of the mountain can be enjoyed with a bushwalk through adjoining Maiala National Park. Breathe in the crisp rainforest air, hike to the waterfall and be serenaded by hundreds of rainforest birds in song.

The historic Wellshot hotel, Ilfracombe

Ilfracombe

Queensland

Ilfracombe, named after a small town in Devonshire England, originated in 1891 as a transport nucleus for Wellshot Station, the largest sheep station in the world at the time (in terms of stock numbers). The town had three hotels - each with its own dance hall, a soft drink maker, a coach builder, two general stores, a billiard saloon, a dressmaker, three commission agents, a couple of butchers, a baker and a saddler. Today there are just 350 people living in an shire which covers 6,500 square kilometres. Another record claimed by the shire is that of the largest mob of sheep ever moved as a single flock. In 1886 a mob of 43,000 sheep were moved through the area by a droving team of 27 horsemen and that doesn't include the cooks, blacksmiths and hands which would have been needed to accompany the drovers. Transport was once the lifeblood of the area when, long before the railway reached as far as Ilfracombe, wagons drawn by up to 30 horses and taking three months carried the wool to the nearest port, Rockhampton, 650 kilometres away. It is unlikely that any other Australian town could boast such a brilliant display of historical machinery, as does Ilfracombe. Not only that, but it’s all on public show, with antique machinery and farm equipment lining the entry road to the town. Nowadays Ilfracombe is a small Outback Queensland township surrounded by large grazing properties, located 27 kilometres east of Longreach and 80 kilometres west of Barcaldine.

Miami Beach

Miami

Queensland

For 69 years, this relaxed Gold Coast suburb was home to Miami Ice, an iconic ice factory built from two recycled army huts which were demolished in 2013. Even Australian singer John Farnham used this venue to film his Two Strong Hearts film clip. But while the controversy over the demolition of this cultural icon has since melted, Miami remains an uber cool place to visit with its burgeoning café culture. A highlight of a visit here is Miami Marketta, where Miami bursts alive with an outdoor dining experience seating 450 people and serving food from around the globe. Edgy local watering holes such as The Cargo Bar and The Shed Bar serve boutique wine and locally-brewed beer, while the main stage is a hot bed of local blues, jazz, roots and independent artists. Blessed with a beautiful beach, a wide range of accommodation, and a host of beach shacks which remind you of the Gold Coast of old, you could be forgiven for thinking you were in that other Miami. Yes, Florida. White suits optional.

Bunya Mountains National Park

Bunya Mountains

Queensland

The majestic Bunya Mountains, situated about 150 kilometres from the coast, is a spectacular wilderness range forming an isolated section of the Great Dividing Range. The immense subtropical range of cool, green rainforest, eucalypt forests and woodlands is home to the world's largest forest of bunya pines. Native wildlife, wallabies and pademelons as well as 121 species of birds including brilliantly coloured king parrots, satin bowerbirds and crimson rosellas, call this area home. The range features panoramic mountain scenery and breathtaking views over the South Burnett region and southern plains. Nights are alive with the sounds of the nocturnal creatures and a myriad of stars, while mornings have a fresh, crisp and clean mountain quality. Aboriginal people historically used the Bunya Mountains as a meeting place for the various tribes scattered throughout Queensland and New South Wales. They feasted seasonally on the bunya nuts collected from the bunya pine trees (Araucaria bidwillii). The Bunya Mountains offer the quiet allure of a retreat environment favoured by families, groups and honeymooners alike. The Bunya Mountains are pristine, peaceful and spectacular, less than three hours from Brisbane and the Fraser Coast and approximately one hour from Kingaroy, Nanango or Dalby.

Bororen Rest Stop

Bororen

Queensland

Back in the war years, Bororen was noted for its pies. Those on active duty almost considered deserting just to get their hands on a Bororen pie. In the 21st century, it's still worthwhile pulling over for a break. The local pub has a great atmosphere, country to its boots. The architecture is great. The town, approximately 50 kilometres south of Gladstone, is quite well known these days for its cattle and timber industries. If you're in town on the right day and at the right time, you may even get to see the local woodsmith at work. The town has a caravan park, hotel/motel and a wide range of services including meals, bait, ice, takeaway meals for those on the move, or just refuelling. Rest areas with toilets, barbeque facilities with shade and somewhere for the kids to have that all important run around.

Informations fournies par la base de données de Tourism Australia