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Dargo

Dargo

Victoria

Enjoy a glimpse into one of Victoria's most remote communities, nestled in the foothills of the legendary Dargo High Plains in Gippsland. The tiny township of Dargo was established as a resting place and a supply town for miners on their way to the nearby Grant, Talbotville and Crooked River goldfields during the minor gold rush of the mid-1800s. These days Dargo has a population of approximately 150 and is an entry point for the Alpine National Park, Avon Wilderness Park and Mitchell River National Park. The wilderness around Dargo boasts first-rate 4WD touring, rafting, fishing and canoeing. The area is also an excellent destination for horse riding, bush walking and hiking. Four-wheel drive out to Wonnangatta Station, once Victoria's most remote cattle station. Dargo is known for its groves of century-old walnut trees that line the valley floor. Many high country cattlemen have homes in the stockbreeding and agricultural district. Dargo is around 320 kilometres from Melbourne CBD with a travel time of just under four hours.

Discover Shepparton

Shepparton

Victoria

Located a leisurely two hour drive from Melbourne, the Greater Shepparton region offers a blend of both provincial and metropolitan lifestyles with a diversity of attractions, events and accommodation perfectly suited for visitors. Discover first hand why Greater Shepparton is renowned internationally as Australia's food bowl with farm gate sales, factory outlets and cellar door options. As Shepparton lies on the banks of the Goulburn River in Victoria's Goulburn Valley, a major agricultural and food processing region with great weather, gourmet food and wine, and excellent recreational and entertainment facilities are part of everyday life in the regional centre. Known as a family friendly destination, Greater Shepparton offers something for everyone. The region is home to Australia's largest adventure playground, KidsTown and Victoria's best small museum for 2012, the Shepparton Art Museum (SAM) home to the MooovingArt initiative. For a fun photo opportunity, look out for Greater Shepparton's unique public art exhibition, a colourful collection of life-sized three dimensional fibreglass cows known as the Moooving Art cows. With more than 90 cows in the herd, each has its own design and are a much-loved celebration of the region's agricultural industry. Learn about Aboriginal culture and history at the Bangerang Keeping Place. Fishing, boating, canoeing and bike riding, all of these can be enjoyed at the Victoria Park Lake precinct or the Yahna Gurtji Shared Path Network, allowing you to discover the majestic Goulburn and Broken Rivers. The stories of the region are reflected in its intriguing history that can be experienced with a visit to Gallery Kaiela, the Bangerang Cultural Centre or exploring 'the Flats' interpretive walk. Visit the Discover Shepparton website to learn more about attractions and upcoming events. They look forward to welcoming you to their wonderful region and all it has to offer.

Mount Hotham Ski Fields

Mount Hotham

Victoria

Victoria's Mount Hotham alpine resort doubles as Australia's 'powder capital' in the winter months and an outdoor adventure playground in the balmy temperatures of spring and summer. The fresh mountain air and 360-degree views from Mount Hotham are stunning in both summer and winter. Mount Hotham is the highest Victorian resort and regularly posts Victoria's highest annual snowfall. It is renowned for its double black diamond terrain. The village has a snowsports school, day-care centre, day spas, shopping, restaurants and nightlife. The huge range of activities includes kat skiing, sunset and grooming tours, dog sled adventures and mini-snowmobile rides for the kids. Life on the mountain has plenty of diversions in the off-season, too, with average summer temperatures of 25 degrees. Walk along cross-country ski trails, trek to Falls Creek, or take the iconic Mount Feathertop Razorback Walk along the crest of the razorback from Mount Hotham to Federation Hut. There are also opportunities for unforgettable horse riding experiences and trout fishing in crystal-clear waterways. Mountain bike along scenic downhill trails and coast back up on the chairlift, which operates over Christmas/New Year and again over Easter. Summer is celebrated on the mountain at the Cool Summer Festival in February and the end of the snow season is marked at the Hotham Spring Carnival at the beginning of September. The Audax Hotham Challenge and the Scody 3 Peaks Challenge are tests of endurance for some of the best road cyclists. When the snow disappears you can start touring, with spectacular views around every turn. Drive or cycle the 230-kilometre Bogong Alpine Way through Bright, Mount Beauty, Falls Creek and over Dinner Plain and Mount Hotham. Mount Hotham is around 380 kilometres from Melbourne and just over four hours by car along the Hume Highway and the Great Alpine Road.

Gippsland

Gippsland

Victoria

Occupying Victoria's eastern corner, Gippsland covers a vast and diverse landscape that includes unspoilt beaches, enormous lakes and immense mountain ranges. Wilsons Promontory, just three hours from Melbourne, is renowned for its stunning bush and coastal scenery and acclaimed walking trails. Central Gippsland is gourmet country, dotted with wineries, cheesemakers, farmers' markets, and fruit and berry farms. Historic gold towns and maritime villages such as Walhalla and Port Albert offer fascinating glimpses into Gippsland's past, while the Mt Baw Baw Alpine Resort is the closest downhill ski area to Melbourne. The Gippsland Lakes are fed by the waters of five major rivers and fringed by the pristine Ninety Mile Beach. The Lakes provide ample opportunities for swimming, fishing, boating and sailing. Dine al fresco at a lakeside restaurant or pub, have a family picnic by a river, or take a stroll through the waterfront villages of Paynesville, Metung or Lakes Entrance. Venture into Victoria's far east to Croajingolong National Park, a World Biosphere Reserve. With more than 100 kilometres of immaculate coastline and hinterland, it is a great place to go bushwalking, surfing or spotting various species of bird and plant life. Mallacoota is a perfect base for exploring the park and also offers excellent fishing and boating.

Lake Nagambie

Nagambie

Victoria

The waters of Lake Nagambie and the Goulburn River enrich the High Country town of Nagambie, which sits among some of Victoria's leading wineries and award-winning restaurants. Fine wines and gourmet produce like locally-grown olive oil are the order of the day at renowned wineries around Nagambie, like Mitchelton Wines with its distinctive observation tower and Tahbilk Winery and Vineyard with its cafe and adjoining Tahbilk Wetlands and Wildlife Reserve. Lake Nagambie hosts Australia's national standard rowing and canoeing titles during summer. Non-professionals can get out on the water, too, whether power boating, jet skiing, sailing, fishing, rowing or canoeing. The township also has the Goulburn River on its doorstep, which is one of Victoria's largest inland river systems and a photogenic bird-watching spot. The river passes through Lake Nagambie and on to the historic Goulburn Weir, seven kilometres north of Nagambie. For a different perspective of the Nagambie area you can sky dive, glide or fly in a hot air balloon. Take in the spectacular views of the magnificent Strathbogie Ranges and surrounding plains. Nagambie is prime thoroughbred horse country, with many leading stables based in the area. Action off the water around Nagambie includes the historic Balaclava Gold Mine at Whroo, the Ned Kelly-themed Avenel Maze, tennis or golf at Nagambie's golf course. Popular local events include the APS Regatta (Heads of the River) and the Nagambie on Water Festival in March. Nagambie is 122 kilometres or just over an hour north of Melbourne travelling along the Hume Freeway to Seymour, then taking the Shepparton turn-off onto the Goulburn Valley Highway.

Maryborough

Maryborough

Victoria

Located in the heart of Victoria's Goldfields region and central to Ballarat and Bendigo, Maryborough was immortalised by none other than Mark Twain who waxed lyrical about the impressive railway station. Mark Twain once described Maryborough as a "railway station with a town attached". The historic railway station, which has one of the southern hemisphere's longest platforms, is now home to an antique emporium, art gallery, wood-work gallery and café. A quarterly antique market is held under the platform's broad roof, attracting thousands who browse collectables, books and old wares. Many ornate gold rush-era facades sit alongside contemporary architecture and contain a myriad of hotels, craft shops, bakeries and cafés. The Central Goldfields Regional Art Gallery breathed life into the old fire station with its regularly changing contemporary exhibitions. Prior to European settlement the area was occupied by the Jajawurrong Aborigines. Head south out of Maryborough to the rock water wells along Wells Track, regarded as some of Victoria's best examples of Aboriginal rock water wells. Look out for the scarred trunks of 'canoe trees' in the area. A trip out of town for a walk in the Paddys Ranges State Park is invigorating, or you can go fossicking for gold or fishing for trout in one of the nearby reservoirs. The nearby Pyrenees wine region is conveniently accessible from Maryborough. Call into a cellar door or two to sample the regional wines. Set out on the Taste of Gold Trail and discover the fresh produce, specialty foods and fine wines that showcase the very best of the Goldfields region. Maryborough is 165 kilometres north-west of Melbourne or approximately two hours by car via Kyneton and Castlemaine on the Pyrenees Highway or via Ballarat on the Western Freeway.

North Melbourne

North Melbourne

Victoria

On the fringe of the Melbourne CBD, North Melbourne marches to its own beat thanks to an eclectic mix of innovative arts, edgy bars and cafes and a welcoming community. High quality, unpretentious cafes, bars and boutiques worth crossing town for are housed beneath the Victorian verandas around Errol Street, inviting convivial brunches, extended afternoon drinks and retail therapy that won't leave regrets. There's no shortage of unassuming restaurants serving up sophisticated food in true North Melbourne style. The North Melbourne Town Hall and its grand clock have morphed into Arts House, a thriving performing arts space (and hub for the Melbourne Fringe Festival). Nearby Meat Market and a handful of smaller exhibition spaces round off the arts precinct. Perched on the border of North Melbourne, the Queen Victoria Market (Queen Vic) is Melbourne's historic landmark and functioning market. Browse the souvenirs, fill your basket with the freshest seafood, meats, fruit and deli delights, and make the difficult choice for lunch. The night market is a highlight of the summer months. One of the last true community festivals in inner-city Melbourne, the October Spring Fling Festival unites North and West Melbourne with entertainment, food, market stalls and workshops. The monthly North Melbourne Market at the Lithuanian Club sells top-quality vintage and handmade goodies. North Melbourne is 2.5 kilometres from Melbourne's GPO. Travel by tram on the Number 57 from Elizabeth Street to the Queen Victoria Market and Errol Street, or Numbers 19 and 59 from Elizabeth Street to the Queen Victoria Market (about 10-20 minutes).

Maldon

Maldon

Victoria

Maldon is a quaint goldmining town that appears to have been plucked directly from the nineteenth century and placed down in Victoria's Goldfields region.. The National Trust declared Maldon Australia's first 'notable town' in 1966 due to its well-preserved nineteenth century buildings. Visitors are enchanted by broad footpaths shaded by corrugated iron verandahs, buildings and cottages made from local stone, old-fashioned shop fronts and deep stone gutters. High Street is cool and verdant in summer with its swathe of deciduous European trees that strike brilliant colours in autumn. Pick up a brochure from the visitor information centre to guide you around the town's historic streetscape. See the Post Office, Penny School, Battery, churches (Welsh, Anglican and Uniting) and the Court House. High Street forks into two main streets, both of which are perfect for browsing antique and collectibles shops and galleries. Discover homewares, books, chocolates, herbal remedies and beautiful imported lace. For a taste of Victoria's gold history visit the recreated 1850s goldmining town at Porcupine Township, wander around the North British Mine, visit the Beehive Mine Chimney and tour Carman's Tunnel. Take a drive up Mount Tarrangower and get a 360-degree view of Maldon and the surrounding countryside from the lookout tower. Climb aboard a steam-era train from Maldon to Muckleford and back with the Victorian Goldfields Railway. To get a taste of the area, follow the Maldon Taste of Gold food and wine trail. Sample local wines and produce from farmgates and cellar doors along the way. There are many regional events that showcase the area's gourmet strengths, so be sure to plan ahead. Maldon is 137 kilometres north-west of Melbourne or about 90 minutes by car via the Calder and Pyrenees highways.

Milawa Cheese Factory

Milawa & King Valley

Victoria

Live la dolce vita with fine food, wine and accommodation in Milawa and King Valley, one of Australia's oldest gourmet regions and Victoria's breadbasket. Victoria's High Country has a history of entrepreneurial and exciting winemaking, which is also reflected in the region's commitment to the freshest produce. A tour of intimate, authentic wineries will be sure to include encounters with winemakers and their families and tastings of uncommon Italian varietals like prosecco, nebbiolo, sangiovese and barbera. Milawa and the King Valley's wineries and farm gates are conveniently close together, perfect for a leisurely cycle between villages. Grab a map from the local Visitor Information Centre, hire a bicycle and fill your basket with local cheeses, nuts, trout, honey, wine and olives. The Milawa Cheese Factory Café is a must for stocking up on homemade cheeses. Sample local mustards, herb vinegars and preserves at Milawa Mustards, and join an olive tasting at the Olive Shop. The well-established Brown Brothers' Epicurean Centre Restaurant is a one-stop shop for the best of the region's produce. The King Valley is as stunning as it is bounteous, surrounded by stunning alpine vistas, acres of vineyards, plains of wildflowers and historic attractions. The Queen's Birthday in June becomes a Weekend Fit For A King with a host of wine and food events around the King Valley. Milawa is 257 kilometres, or just under three hours by car from Melbourne along the Hume Highway.

Warrnambool

Warrnambool

Victoria

Warrnambool is nestled into the rising contour of Victoria's south-west coast amid green dairying country and overlooking the deep blue of the Southern Ocean, where southern right whales can be see performing. The only city on the rugged Shipwreck Coast, Warrnambool has had a long and colourful history linked with the sea. Much of this history is on show at the Flagstaff Hill Maritime Museum. Original buildings, a lighthouse and recreated port complete with ships provide a fascinating insight into the city's nineteenth century life. Warrnambool is known as Victoria's Southern Right Whale nursery. The giants of the sea return to Logan's Beach between May and October and can often be seen just 100 metres off the shore from the viewing platform in the sand dunes. Its location on the wide sweep of Lady Bay gives Warrnambool marvellous beaches that heave with beach goers over summer. Explore numerous coastal reserves and walking tracks with secluded beaches and rocky points, penguin colonies, and some good places for fishing and bird watching. The city has a thriving arts and events scene, excellent restaurants serving the best and freshest local produce and a relaxed cafe scene, most evident at the bottom end of Liebig Street. A few kilometres west of town is Tower Hill State Game Reserve, home to an ancient volcanic crater complete with lake and lava tongue. Discover a unique microcosm of botany and wildlife along the walking tracks. Popular local events include the Fun 4 Kids Festival, which celebrates imagination and creative spirit, and Warrnambool May Racing Carnival, country racing at its best. Warrnambool is approximately 265 kilometres west of Melbourne, or just over three hours by car along the Princes Highway. The scenic journey along the Great Ocean Road takes around five hours.

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