Tasmanian Wilderness
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Tasmanian Wilderness


Step into the ancient beauty of Tasmania's World Heritage wilderness and national parks. From Hobart, discover Bruny Island's wildlife and walking trails and drive the East Coast Escape to Wineglass Bay in Freycinet National Park. Launceston is your base for the Overland Track through Cradle-Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, and the untamed rivers and rapids of the west coast.

What you can see in the Tasmanian Wilderness

The tranquil and ancient beauty of Tasmania's wilderness offers pristine beaches, walking trails through the mountains and lakes of its 17 National Parks.

Wineglass Bay, Tasmania

Wineglass Bay, Tasmania

Wineglass Bay, Tasmania

Wineglass Bay, on Tasmania's Freycinet Peninsula, is considered one of the top ten beaches in the world. This flawless crescent of dazzling white sand and sapphire-coloured sea set against pink and grey granite peaks is one of Australia's most beautiful natural environments. It's the perfect location for fishing, sailing, bushwalking, sea kayaking, rock-climbing, or simply soaking up the spectacular coastal scenery. Wineglass Bay has become a favourite honeymoon destination for couples to escape and relax away from the rest of the world. With secluded sandy beaches, luxurious eco-lodges, and fine Tasmanian cuisine, Freycinet Peninsula is an adventure of pure indulgence.

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The Overland Track

The Overland Track

The Overland Track

Travel through the heart of Tasmania’s World Heritage-listed wilderness on this famous 65-kilometre trek from Cradle Mountain to Lake St Clair. Walk the entire Overland Track in six days or do short and day walks from the Cradle Mountain Visitor Centre and Dove Lake. Remember the end-to-end walk requires planning. You’ll need to book in advance with Tasmania’s Parks & Wildlife Service and take with you a good tent and warm sleeping bag. While the route has eight basic stove-heated huts, there’s no guarantee of space. The best time to walk the track is between November and April, when the weather is milder and days are longer for Daylight Saving. During April, you can see the spectacular changing colours of the deciduous beech. As well as a physical challenge, this walk is a true communion with nature. You’ll see lakes, forests and gorges, mountains and moors, spectacular waterfalls and steep, stony peaks.

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East Coast Escape

East Coast Escape

East Coast Escape

Immerse yourself in the beauty of Tasmania’s east coast on this attraction-packed drive. Sea kayak and hunt down history on Maria Island, sample farm-fresh berries and wine near Swansea and take in the perfect contours of Wineglass Bay in Freycinet National Park. Stop in Bicheno, where you can cling to the coastline on a motorised trike ride or see fairy penguins waddle home at dusk. Bushwalk in the rainforest of Douglas-Apsley National Park and game fish or dive from the picturesque port of St Helens Park. Swim in the calm, clear waters of Binnalong Bay and follow the Bay of Fires walk past Aboriginal middens, woodlands and powder-white beaches. Finish your journey in a remote eco-lodge with soul-stirring ocean views.

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Freycinet

Freycinet

Freycinet

Experience the beauty of Freycinet Peninsula, a paradise of pink granite mountains, white beaches and turquoise sea on Tasmania's east coast. Hike over the Hazard Ranges for breathtaking views of Wineglass Bay. Go surfing, sea kayak with dolphins, 4WD to a historic lighthouse and enjoy freshly-shucked oysters overlooking Great Oyster Bay. Wind here from Hobart on the East Coast Escape.

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Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

You'll feel a million miles from modern life when you glimpse the jagged dolerite peaks of Cradle Mountain across the mirrored waters of Dove Lake. It's a wilderness vision that draws travelers to World Heritage-listed Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park time and time again.

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Tasmanian Wilderness Highlights

Tasmanian Wilderness Highlights

Tasmanian Wilderness Highlights

Experience the ancient and epic beauty of Tasmania’s 17 national parks. Many of these are part of the World Heritage-listed wilderness that makes up 20 per cent of the island. Climb over the Hazard Ranges and lose your breath at postcard-perfect Wineglass Bay in Freycinet National Park. See your face in Dove Lake and trek the Overland Track in Cradle-Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park. Bushwalk through Gondwanan rainforest and discover the 18th century French garden of Recherche Bay in South West National Park. Take in Russell Falls, towering swamp gums and ski fields in Mount Field National Park. Cruise the silent Gordon River and whitewater raft down the Franklin in Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park. However you weave through Tasmania’s natural wonders, we can bet you won’t want to leave.

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Tasmania's Wild West Coast

Tasmania's Wild West Coast

Tasmania's Wild West Coast

On the west coast of Tasmania, unlimited adventure is the natural way to holiday. Base yourself in the scenic, edge-of-the-world fishing town of Strahan. Then white-water raft the pristine and untamed Franklin River rapids or cruise or kayak down the tranquil Gordon River. Hike past thousand-year-old Huon pines in one of the world's last temperate rainforests. Soar over the wilderness in a helicopter, take an historic train from Queenstown or sail across Macquarie Harbour. This area also has a rich, layered human story - of convicts, pioneers, loggers, miners and more recently, environmental activists.

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Bruny Island

Bruny Island

Bruny Island

Invigorate your soul on wild Bruny Island, which sits in the D'Entrecasteaux Channel, a short drive and ferry ride from Hobart. Go walking to discover the rocky coastline, quiet beaches, tall forests, roaring surf and gentle green hills. Spot abundant wildlife, from wombats and wallabies to little penguins, on a tour or eco-cruise. Hunt down history, stock up on gourmet produce and stay in boutique accommodation amongst the wilderness.

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Walking Tasmania's Wilderness

Walking Tasmania's Wilderness

Walking Tasmania's Wilderness

Put one foot in front of the other for long enough and you might just forget where you came from. Of course, it helps if you're headed through the epic, ancient and transforming wilderness that has made Tasmania a haven for walkers across the world. Almost half of this small and scenic state is protected within national parks and reserves and 20 per cent is World Heritage-listed. The 17 national parks are crisscrossed with thousands of kilometres of trails ranging from daredevil to dreamy. Long and short, gentle and giant, here are just some of the wonderful Tasmanian walks that can take you away from it all.

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The Tasmanian Devil

The Tasmanian Devil

The Tasmanian Devil

The Tasmanian devil is a carnivorous marsupial with the appearance of a small, stocky dog. It has a broad head, thick tail and coarse, black fur. The Tasmanian devil was given its common name by early European settlers, who were haunted at night by its screeches and demonic growls. Despite its appearance and reputation, the Tasmanian devil is actually a shy creature. It is the world’s largest carnivorous marsupial since the Tasmanian tiger became extinct in 1936. Since 1995 Tasmanian devils have been ravaged by devil facial tumour disease, and as a result are now a protected species. See them in wildlife parks in Tasmania, such as Taranna on the Tasman Peninsula.

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Cradle Mountain, TAS. Photo by Kim Maisch Photography.

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Winter wombats. Cradle Mountain, TAS. Photo by Wayne Sorensen.
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The unforgettable view, Cradle Mountain, TAS. Photo by @lokmannorazmi on Instagram.
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Kayaking on Dove Lake, Cradle Mountain, TAS. Photo by @tailoredtasmania on Instagram.
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